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November 23, 2011

Diesel Head, the misfuel prevention device that is head of the class


Remember years ago, when comedians told jokes about women drivers? They’d be laughing on the other side of their faces more recently, as a survey* revealed that, in reality, more men than women misfuel. However, all parties can now have smiles on their faces as a British engineer has developed Diesel Head, a device which prevents motorists putting petrol in diesel vehicles, known as misfuelling.

The problem of misfuelling has been with us for years. The growing popularity of diesel cars and the fact that more homes these days have both a petrol and a diesel car on the drive, however, means that the potential for misfuels is on the increase.


Diesel Head inventor, Lee Steadman, says: “I realisedthat this problem demanded a solution which was fit for purpose, totally reliable, easy to fit and easy to use.”

It has taken two years from Lee’s ‘Eureka’ moment, to design, model, test and manufacture prototypes of his solution to the problem of misfuelling. The product has now come on the market, ready to meet the stringent demands of both environment and consumers.

“Most people do not realisethat a petrol nozzle is smaller in diameter than a diesel fuel nozzle and it is this fact that gave me the solution,” continues Lee.

“The opening to a fuel tank fitted with a Diesel Head needs a ‘diesel’ diameter nozzle to activate the opening and let the nozzle in - as a result the smaller petrol nozzle cannot open the Diesel Head and so the car is protected.

“The Diesel Head really is a ‘fit and forget’ product, which is essential as many misfuels arise because of distraction. We all lead busy lives and rarely have the luxury of being able to only concentrate on one thing.

“It’s so easy when in a rush to select the wrong fuel nozzle and pump petrol into a diesel car or van, particularly when driving with the objective of doing something important or critical, such as meeting a child from school or a relative at the airport. Sadly, this means the misfuel usually happens at the worst possible moment.

“I also recognisedthat, for many drivers, the real concern was not the wasted fuel but rather that they were inconvenienced, unable to achieve the purpose of the journey – the consequence not the cost, if you will.”

| Diesel Head